207 killed and hundreds injured as terrorists attack churches and 5-star hotels in Sri Lanka on Easter

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Terrorists attacking Christian devotees in Sri Lanka by targeting churches and five star hotels on the occasion of Easter have left 207 dead and hundreds injured. A spokesman for a Colombo hospital has said that nine foreigners were among the dead

President Maithripala Sirisena has issued a statement calling for people to remain calm and support the authorities in their investigations. Meanwhile, disturbing videos from the blasts sites have emerged on social media, where Christian devotees could be seen scurrying for cover in pain as the sound of cry engulf the air.



Some local media reported that at least 10 people had been declared deal. According to BBC, the Shangri La, Cinnamon Grand and Kingsbury hotels, all in Colombo, were also targeted.

The explosion literally ripped through St Anthony’s Shrine in Colombo, causing several casualties among Easter worshippers. A report by Sky News said that further explosions hit St Sebastian’s Church in Negombo, north of Colombo, and another place of worship in the eastern town of Batticaloa. Some foreign nationals are also believed to be among victims.

Easter Sunday is one of the major feasts in the Christian calendar.

Live Updates:

  • Sri Lanka imposes ‘temporary’ social media ban and 12 hour curfew after blasts
  • It was a well-planned, co-ordinated attack but I spoke to the security chief who was there and officials believe it’s too early to say who is behind it, says BBC Sinhala reporter
  • A seventh explosion has been reported in Dehiwela near Colombo, Sri Lanka.
  • No one has claimed responsibility for the blasts.
  • A senior official, quoted by the Associated Press, has said at least two of the blasts were suspected to have been caused by suicide bombers.
  • Local media has reported 25 people were also killed in an attack on an evangelical church in Batticaloa in Eastern Province.

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