Chinese university bans students from holding hands, feeding each other with spoon


Worried by the “alarming rise” in the “uncivilised” behaviour among students, a university in China has responded with a ban on holding hands, putting their arms around each others’ shoulders or spooning rice into their partners’ mouths.

According to China’s New Culture View newspaper: “An assistant teacher will have  private conversations with those who are in love, telling them not to have physical contact or engage in improper behaviour on campus.”

One teacher was reported to have said that the clampdown intended to help students “cultivate themselves to become civilised people.” But the social media users in China have mocked the new code of conduct, released by Jilin Construction University in the city of Changsha.

The authorities have also installed cameras in the university canteens to ensure students in love are banned from feeding each other or any such “intimate behaviour”.

“Improper behaviour, like kissing and hugging in public places such as the subway, have been [widely] revealed by the media. If such behaviours are seen in the canteen, we don’t think it’s proper,” a teacher was quoted by the newspaper.

The teacher said the move was merely a preventive exercise.

He said, “The norm is in place so that students will be aware of the problem and cultivate themselves to be civilised people. If such codes of conduct are deeply rooted in students’ hearts they, as well-educated people, will hesitate next time.”

However, one social media user in China reportedly wrote, “This norm is weird and we can’t help laughing. It’s the 21st century. As adults, we don’t dare to behave so explicitly in public places. I never see lovers feed each other rice, so the norm is unnecessary.”

There were others who saw a merit in the new diktat.

“I like the norm,” one Chinese social media user wrote. “This is a gift from the university to single students as Single’s Day is around the corner.” A canteen worker said: “We’ve cameras covering the canteen to ensure safety. I’m pleased as it’s necessary to prevent uncivilised behaviour.” But admitted: “I’ve never seen students feeding each other rice.”