BJP supports 80 per cent reservation for Bihar natives


Opposition BJP on Monday supported demand for reservation of 80 per cent of seats to Bihar natives in state jobs and admission in state-run professional colleges, while hitting out at Chief Minister Nitish Kumar and RJD chief Lalu Prasad for only making “statements” for political gain.

“BJP is in favour of reservation of 80 per cent of seats in professional institutions and state jobs as mooted by RJD President Lalu Prasad and in principle supported by CM Nitish Kumar,” senior BJP leader Sushil Kumar Modi told reporters.

“But, it seems both Nitish Kumar and Lalu Prasad are more interested in making statements in this regard for political grounds but not doing anything concrete on the ground,” he said in his Legislative Council chamber.

BJP state President and MLC Mangal Pandey and Rajneesh Kumar today raised the issue in the Legislative Council. In reply to a question that the CM has asked the Centre to intervene on the issue of domicialry allegedly erupting in different parts of the country, Modi, leader of opposition in the state’s Upper House, said, “The Centre has no role in such issues.

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” Referring to Lalu Prasad’s allegations that outside candidates were getting selected in interviews for the post of Assistant Professor conducted by Bihar Public Service Commission (BPSC) due to lack of domiciliary policy, the BJP leader said the state government was to blame for this.


“Despite clear cut guidelines from the Centre that candidates having done PhD before 2009 are eligible for interview for the post of Assistant Professor, the Nitish Kumar government has not put it into practice,” he said.

State Education minister Ashok Choudhary had in fact assured the Legislative Council that PhDs completed before 2009 would be recognised in BPSC exam in the Budget session early this year, but still it had not come into practise and BPSC was carrying interviews in which 80 per cent of successful candidates were outsiders, he said.